The Daily News Register

The Daily Register offers citations of recent publications and news
related to the history of alcohol and drugs.

 

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Ecstasy (MDMA) considered for PTSD treatment

See Wall Street Journal, 18 Oct. 2017

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WCTU in Meiji Japan (article)

Seto Tomoko, ” Organizing’ Meiji Women: the role of the Japanese chapter of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union for individual activists, 1900-1905. “Journal of Women’s History Review 26/6 (Dec. 2017): 975-993.

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Temperance website sponsored by the Alliance House Foundation

alliancehousefoundation.org.uk

The Alliance House Foundation, the descendant of the United Kingdom Alliance, has a new temperance website that provides many historical resources.

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When chocolate was medicine (article)

Christine Jones, “When Chocolate was Medicine: Colmenero, Wadsworth, and Dufour,” Public Domain Review.  In progress, An Edible World: Hot Beverages, Orientalism, and the French Enlightenment (in progress) Seventeenth-century Europeans believed coffee, chocolate, and tea—exotic “drugs”—could heal or poison. A century later, they were culinary staples. Hot beverages are understudied accessories to sociability and ciphers through which France explored, understood, and global culture in the wake of early diplomatic and mercantile expeditions. An Edible World takes up the print reception history of coffee, chocolate and tea to show that these three drinks changed the way Europe imagined the rest of the world.

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Goose Island and Budweiser (book)

Josh Noel, Barrel-Aged Stout and Selling Out: Goose Island, Anheuser-Busch, and How Craft Beer Became Big Business (Chicago Review Press, forthcoming June 1, 2018).

From publisher:

Goose Island opened as a family-owned Chicago brewpub in the late 1980s, and it soon became one of the most inventive breweries in the world. In the golden age of light, bland and cheap beers, John Hall and his son Greg brought European flavors to America. With distribution in two dozen states, two brewpubs, and status as one of the 20 biggest breweries in the United States, Goose Island became an American success story, and was a champion of craft beer.

Then, on March 28, 2011, the Halls sold the brewery to Anheuser-Busch InBev, maker of Budweiser, the least craft-like beer imaginable.   The sale forced the industry to reckon with craft beer’s mainstream appeal and a popularity few envisioned.

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Northern Ireland drinking more, Welsh less

“Tax receipts suggest that the Irish are drinking more than the rest of us. The Welsh, by contrast, seem to be drinking less.”  England seems to be smoking less than in earlier years.

Telegraph, 4 October 2017.

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