Myths about the temperance movement (article)

Mark Lawrence Schrad, “On Prohibition’s 100th Anniversary, Here’s a Distillation of 3 Myths about the Temperance Movement,”Washington Post, 1 Aug. 2017.

A political scientist who focuses on modern Russia, Schrad is currently writing a global history of prohibition.  See also Schrad, “The Transnational Temperance Community,” in Marie-Laure Djelic and Sigrid Quack, Transnational Communities(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010). This essay is based on chapter two in his book, The Political Power of Bad Ideas: Networks, Institutions, and the Global Prohibition Wave (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).

 

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Should historians of temperance emphasize the drink “traffic”? (article)

Mark Lawrence Schrad, “Rethinking Prohibition’s ‘Puritan’ Origins on 100th Anniversary,” (Charleston) Post & Courier, 6 Aug. 2017. Reprinted from Washington Post.  A political scientist who focuses on modern Russia, Schrad is currently writing a global history of prohibition.  See also Schrad, “The Transnational Temperance Community,” in Marie-Laure Djelic and Sigrid Quack, Transnational Communities(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010). This essay is based on chapter two in his book, The Political Power of Bad Ideas: Networks, Institutions, and the Global Prohibition Wave (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010). 

Surveying Drug Prevention

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes from contributing editor Dr. Seth Blumenthal. In it, he surveys how schools, parents, and Congress responded to increased drug use in the 20th century through anti-drug abuse education initiatives. 

In the opening scene of the 1936 cult classic Reefer Madness, Dr. Alfred Carrol speaks to a parents’ group about preventing the “marijuana menace” that threatened their children. Haranguing the terrified mothers and fathers during the meeting, Carrol explains that this “frightful assassin of youth” could be stamped out with “compulsory education on the subject of narcotics in general, but marijuana in particular.” Carrol argued that “enlightenment” was the path to eliminating this “scourge.” However, the focus on educating parents to “Tell your Children,” the title of Carrol’s talk and one of Reefer Madness’s other titles, proved more popular than mandated public school education.  In fact, it would be decades before Americans felt…

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