Chai and chai wallahs

In India, chai is more than just a cup of tea to start the day – the thick sweet drink is an integral part of the rhythm of life. Zach Marks and Resham Gellatly have been documenting the culture of Indian chai and the people who sell it – known as chai wallahs.

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-27991440

Tea-Drinking Habit among New University Students in Taiwan (article)

Hsiu Chen Tseng et al., “Tea-Drinking Habit among New University Students: Associated Factors,” Kaohsiung Journal of Medical Sciences 30, no. 2 (2014): 98–103. “Multiple logistic regression analysis showed the following factors were significant predictors of tea drinking: postgraduate students (p < 0.001), coffee drinking (p < 0.001), alcohol drinking (p < 0.001), minor mental morbidity (p = 0.009), poorer sleepers (p = 0.037), higher body mass index (p = 0.004), and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (p < 0.001). Our data showed that the tea-drinking habit was correlated with higher body mass index, which was contrary to the findings of a previous study.”

Tea, coffee, chocolate, alcohol (conference papers)

Food in History, 82nd Anglo-American Conference of Historians, 11-13 July 2013

Ian Miller (University College Dublin), A Dangerous, Revolutionary Force amongst Us’: Conceptualizing Working-Class Tea Drinking in the British Isles, c.1860-1900 

Dark secrets shared: chocolate, coffee and glocalisation 1: Transnational approaches

Chair: Margrit Schulte (Dusseldorf)
Jonathan Morris (University of Hertfordshire), The Espresso Menu: An International History
Margrit Schulte (Beerbühl), Transferring Sweet Secrets: Transnational connections in the European Chocolate Industry
Angelika Epple (Bielefeld), Chocolate and the Invention of Quality
Ruben Quass (Bielefeld), Fair Trade Coffee. “Global” Product – “Glocal” Project – “Local” Goals? 

Food and the British empire in the 18th century

Chair: Christopher Currie (IHR)
Molly Perry (The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg), ‘Flowing Bowls and Bumping Glasses’: Raising Toasts, Declaring Loyalty, and Protesting in the British Empire

 Dark secrets shared 2: chocolate, coffee and glocalisation: Comparative approaches

Chair: Jonathan Morris (University of Hertfordshire)
Tatsuya Mitsuda (Keio University, Tokyo), The hybridization of tastes: chocolate in Japan, c.1900-1970
Yavuz Köse (University of Hamburg), Chocolate and Coffee in the Late Ottoman Empire and Turkish Republic
Merry White (Boston University), Coffee Japanese Style