Smuggling Booze and Aliens from Cuba to Florida during Prohibition (article)

Lindquist Dorr, Lisa. “Bootlegging Aliens: Unsanctioned Immigration and the Underground Economy of Smuggling from Cuba during Prohibition.” Florida Historical Quarterly 93, no. 1 (Summer 2014): 44–73. On the smuggling of illegal immigrants and liquor from Cuba to Florida during the 1920s. Among other things, explains: “When profits from booze became risky and the passage of the most stringent immigration restriction law in 1924 increased the number of desperate immigrants . . . , “bootlegging aliens” . . . quickly expanded as an alternative source of profit for smugglers” (46). And: “European makers of cognac, whiskey, scotch, gin, vodka, wine and champagne shipped thousands of cases of liquor to ports like Havanna, knowing that they would eventually end up as contraband in the United States” (49).

Alcohol, the Atlantic, and the distilling of colonial identity, 1650-1800 (dissertation in progress)

Kristen D. Burton, “John Barleycorn vs. Sir Richard Rum: Alcohol, the Atlantic, and the Distilling of Colonial Identity, 1650-1800,” Ph.D. dissertation in progress, University of Texas-Arlington.  On her website, she says: “My project will show how the changing patterns of consumption, along with the emerging theories of the Enlightenment, paved the way for the growing movement against alcohol in the 1800s.”