Tea, coffee, chocolate, alcohol (conference papers)

Food in History, 82nd Anglo-American Conference of Historians, 11-13 July 2013

Ian Miller (University College Dublin), A Dangerous, Revolutionary Force amongst Us’: Conceptualizing Working-Class Tea Drinking in the British Isles, c.1860-1900 

Dark secrets shared: chocolate, coffee and glocalisation 1: Transnational approaches

Chair: Margrit Schulte (Dusseldorf)
Jonathan Morris (University of Hertfordshire), The Espresso Menu: An International History
Margrit Schulte (Beerbühl), Transferring Sweet Secrets: Transnational connections in the European Chocolate Industry
Angelika Epple (Bielefeld), Chocolate and the Invention of Quality
Ruben Quass (Bielefeld), Fair Trade Coffee. “Global” Product – “Glocal” Project – “Local” Goals? 

Food and the British empire in the 18th century

Chair: Christopher Currie (IHR)
Molly Perry (The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg), ‘Flowing Bowls and Bumping Glasses’: Raising Toasts, Declaring Loyalty, and Protesting in the British Empire

 Dark secrets shared 2: chocolate, coffee and glocalisation: Comparative approaches

Chair: Jonathan Morris (University of Hertfordshire)
Tatsuya Mitsuda (Keio University, Tokyo), The hybridization of tastes: chocolate in Japan, c.1900-1970
Yavuz Köse (University of Hamburg), Chocolate and Coffee in the Late Ottoman Empire and Turkish Republic
Merry White (Boston University), Coffee Japanese Style

Brewing in Britain and Ireland (book)

James Sumner, Brewing Science, Technology and Print, 1700-1880 [Science and Culture in the Nineteenth Century] (Pickering & Chatto, 2013).  Lecturer in the history of technology at the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of Manchester.  He is the author of “Status, scale and secret ingredients: the retrospective invention of London porter”. History and Technology 24:3 (2008), 289-306.