Study of Illicit Drug Use in Slovakia Based on Wastewater Analysis (article)

Mackulak, T., J. Skubak, R. Grabic, J. Ryba, L. Birosova, G. Fedorova, V. Spalkova, and I. Bodik. “National Study of Illicit Drug Use in Slovakia Based on Wastewater Analysis.” Science of the Total Environment 494–95 (2014): 158–65. Analysis of “illicit drugs and their metabolites in wastewater from eight selected wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Slovakia.” Estimates that “Slovakia has one of highest methamphetamine consumption rates in Europe,” that “amphetamine, ecstasy and cannabis consumption” during the period of the study were “comparable to that found in other European cities,” and “cocaine consumption was lower.” Also notes that different kinds of music festivals corresponded with different kinds of drugs; one kind of festival corresponds with a spike in ecstasy use and another corresponds with a spike in methamphetamine and cocaine use.

Depression, Impulsiveness, Sleep, and Memory in Past and Present Polydrug Users of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (article)

Lynn Taurah, Chris Chandler, and Geoff Sanders, “Depression, Impulsiveness, Sleep, and Memory in Past and Present Polydrug Users of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy),” Psychopharmacology 231, no. 4 (2014): 737 – 751. Documents the persistent “record of impaired memory and clinically significant levels of depression, impulsiveness, and sleep disturbance” among “present ecstasy users” as well as among “past users after an abstinence of 4 or more years.” Concludes that “the prognosis for the current generation of ecstasy users is a major cause for concern.”

Ecstasy use in 19-23 year-old Australians

A. Smirnov et al., “Young Adults’ Trajectories of Ecstasy Use: A Population Based Study,” Addictive Behaviors 38, no. 11 (2013): 2667–2674. Describes a recent study of Ecstasy users in Australia aged 19-23 years over 30 months. Concludes that “Intermediate and high-use trajectory membership was predicted by past Ecstasy consumption (>70 pills) and attendance at electronic/dance music events,” and “high-use trajectory members were unlikely to have used Ecstasy for more than 3 years and tended to report consistently positive subjective effects at baseline.”

Drug-related deaths in Nova Scotia, 2007-2010

Sharon Ling, “Trend Analysis on Drug-Related Deaths in Nova Scotia: A Study on Prescription and Illicit Drugs,” Canadian Journal of Addiction Medicine 4, no. 1 (February 2013): 11–17. Observes that the middle-aged are more likely than the young to die by illicit drug use or prescription, alcohol, or over-the-counter drug use. Urges “urges policymakers to make changes to the illicit drug centric and youth centric anti-drug strategy in Canada, to increase the focus on prescription drug abuse/misuse and to also target the middle-aged demographic.”