Tea, coffee, chocolate, alcohol (conference papers)

Food in History, 82nd Anglo-American Conference of Historians, 11-13 July 2013

Ian Miller (University College Dublin), A Dangerous, Revolutionary Force amongst Us’: Conceptualizing Working-Class Tea Drinking in the British Isles, c.1860-1900 

Dark secrets shared: chocolate, coffee and glocalisation 1: Transnational approaches

Chair: Margrit Schulte (Dusseldorf)
Jonathan Morris (University of Hertfordshire), The Espresso Menu: An International History
Margrit Schulte (Beerbühl), Transferring Sweet Secrets: Transnational connections in the European Chocolate Industry
Angelika Epple (Bielefeld), Chocolate and the Invention of Quality
Ruben Quass (Bielefeld), Fair Trade Coffee. “Global” Product – “Glocal” Project – “Local” Goals? 

Food and the British empire in the 18th century

Chair: Christopher Currie (IHR)
Molly Perry (The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg), ‘Flowing Bowls and Bumping Glasses’: Raising Toasts, Declaring Loyalty, and Protesting in the British Empire

 Dark secrets shared 2: chocolate, coffee and glocalisation: Comparative approaches

Chair: Jonathan Morris (University of Hertfordshire)
Tatsuya Mitsuda (Keio University, Tokyo), The hybridization of tastes: chocolate in Japan, c.1900-1970
Yavuz Köse (University of Hamburg), Chocolate and Coffee in the Late Ottoman Empire and Turkish Republic
Merry White (Boston University), Coffee Japanese Style

Border contraband (book)

Elaine Carey and Andrae M. Marak, eds., Smugglers, Brothels, and Twine: Historical Perspectives on Contraband and Vice in North America’s Borderlands (University of Arizona Press, 2011).  Carey is the author of the forthcoming monograph, Selling is More of a Habit: Women and Drug Trafficking, 1900-1970.

Publisher’s summary:

In this volume the borders of North America serve as central locations for examining the consequences of globalization as it intersects with hegemonic spaces and ideas, national territorialism, and opportunities for—or restrictions on—mobility. The authors of the essays in this collection warn against falling victim to the myth of nation-states engaging in a valiant struggle against transnational flows of crime and vice. They take a long historical perspective, from Mesoamerican counterfeits of cacao beans used as currency to cattle rustling to human trafficking; from Canada’s and Mexico’s different approaches to the illegality of liquor in the United States during Prohibition to contemporary case studies of the transnational movement of people, crime, narcotics, vice, and even ideas.

By studying the historical flows of contraband and vice across North American borders, the contributors seek to bring a greater understanding of borderlanders, the actual agents of historical change who often remain on the periphery of most historical analyses that focus on the state or on policy.

To examine the political, economic, and social shifts resulting from the transnational movement of goods, people, and ideas, these contributions employ the analytical categories of race, class, modernity, and gender that underlie this evolution. Chapters focus on the ways power relations created opportunities for engaging in “deviance,” thus questioning the constructs of economic reality versus concepts of criminal behavior. Looking through the lens of transnational flows of contraband and vice, the authors develop a new understanding of nation, immigration, modernization, globalization, consumer society, and border culture.