Kreminar – Dr. Emily Dufton talk

The American Institute of the History of Pharmacy and the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Pharmacy are pleased to announce the inaugural Edward Kremers Seminar in the History of Pharmacy & Drugs. The 2020 Summer “Kreminar” will explore the theme of Cannabis and will feature presentations and discussions by five scholars researching and writing about the history of cannabis.

This week Dr. Emily Dufton, ADHS’s Media Officer, will present on “Grassroots: A History of Marijuana’s Ups and Downs in America.” Learn more here. Sign up to listen in (registration free and takes 2 mins) and be sure to share with other ADHS members and interested parties. Also, live closed captioning will be available.

Abstract: As legalization initiatives continue to expand across the United States, many of its proponents believe that full federal legalization is inevitable. But pro-marijuana activists believed this in the 1970s too, when decriminalization spread to over a third of the country, only to see their work rolled back by a wave of powerful anti-cannabis parent activism. Marijuana’s legal status has shifted from criminalization to legalization and back again multiple times over the past fifty years, and may continue to change long into the future. This talk will discuss the role grassroots activists have played in changing marijuana’s public perception and legal status from the 1960s to today, and what we might expect in the years to come.

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Cannabis Webinars

The American Institute of the History of Pharmacy and the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Pharmacy are pleased to announce the inaugural Edward Kremers Seminar in the History of Pharmacy & Drugs. The 2020 Summer “Kreminar” will explore the theme of Cannabis and will feature presentations and discussions by five scholars researching and writing about the history of cannabis. Talks will be given by ADHS social media officer Emily Dufton and SHAD book review editor David Guba Jr. Sign up to listen in (registration 2 mins) and be sure to share with other ADHS members and interested parties.

From Hippies to High Yield Insights: The Evolution of an Industry

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Mike Luce is not the first person to lament how increasingly banal marijuana becomes once the industry goes mainstream. Keith Stroup, who founded the nation’s oldest legalization lobbying firm, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), in 1970, told Rolling Stone in 1977 that the decade’s booming paraphernalia industry was developing just like anything else. “It’s a growth industry,” Stroup said, “that’s gonna be treated like tennis shoes must have been. I don’t say this out of any particular glee—I just think it’s a result of ‘the great free-enterprise system.’”

Screenshot 2018-11-28 14.47.09Luce, who founded High Yield Insights, one of the nation’s first cannabis marketing research firms, this past May, feels similarly as recreational legalization expands. “From a great distance,” Luce said, the “classic marketing research” High Yield does for its clients—which includes everything from crafting tailored patient and consumer insight reports, to consulting medical and recreational businesses…

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Legalization Report: NIMBY in Newton, Massachusetts

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes from Dr. Seth Blumenthal, contributing editor and lecturer at Boston University. He’s been tracking the roll out of recreational marijuana legalization in his home state of Massachusetts and provides this report. Enjoy!

As I sat behind the police chief while he spoke to the City Council in favor of a ban on marijuana dispensaries in my city–Newton, Massachusetts–I realized I was in trouble. Surrounding me in the public seating section, every other attendee held up a brightly colored “Opt Out” sign in silence. One nice woman even asked me if I wanted a sign, which I politely declined. After all, I was there to follow the chief and offer a rebuttal. As a historian with a focus on marijuana history, I had already been active as an academic endorser for Question 4 that legalized marijuana in 2016, and so I was asked to speak…

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Sex on Drugs at the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library

Pharmacosexuality

by Alex

Julio Santo Domingo Jr was part of a Columbian business dynasty, straitjacketed by the trappings that came with moneyed social convention. Thoughout his life, though, he developed a seemingly insatiable appetite for collecting materials on ‘altered states’, sex, magick, and the occult, which he amassed from bookshops, auctions and galleries across the globe. Filling warehouses and mansions with rare first editions, pulp novels, letters and posters, after his death the collection was bequeathed to Harvard University, and a book appeared in 2017, Altered States, to accompany an exhibition at the Houghton Library, documenting the development of the collection and Santo Domingo’s vision and mentality.

It’s difficult to emphasise enough the sheer scale of the archive. Some estimates suggest that it numbers 100,000 individual items, and would fill at least three terraced houses. I was lucky enough to spend two weeks in October 2018, foraging for material that…

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Surveying Drug Prevention

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes from contributing editor Dr. Seth Blumenthal. In it, he surveys how schools, parents, and Congress responded to increased drug use in the 20th century through anti-drug abuse education initiatives. 

In the opening scene of the 1936 cult classic Reefer Madness, Dr. Alfred Carrol speaks to a parents’ group about preventing the “marijuana menace” that threatened their children. Haranguing the terrified mothers and fathers during the meeting, Carrol explains that this “frightful assassin of youth” could be stamped out with “compulsory education on the subject of narcotics in general, but marijuana in particular.” Carrol argued that “enlightenment” was the path to eliminating this “scourge.” However, the focus on educating parents to “Tell your Children,” the title of Carrol’s talk and one of Reefer Madness’s other titles, proved more popular than mandated public school education.  In fact, it would be decades before Americans felt…

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