Announcement – SHAD meets Chicago!

The Social History of Alcohol and Drugs joins the University of Chicago Press journals program

October 4, 2018

The editors of The Social History of Alcohol and Drugs: An Interdisciplinary Journal (SHAD) are pleased to announce that the journal has joined the publishing program of The University of Chicago Press. Building on 30 years of publication, we will release our first issue with the Press in 2019. The journal will be available both in print and online. For further information, please see: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/shad/pr/180921

The Social History of Alcohol and Drugs is dedicated to publishing high-quality original research, reflection essays, and reviews in the field of alcohol and drug history, broadly construed. Multidisciplinary and supported by top scholars in the field, SHAD is the only English-language academic journal devoted to this diverse topic.

The journal appears twice annually as an official publication of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society, which promotes scholarship on the history of alcohol and drug use, abuse, production, trade, and regulation across time and space. Scholars publishing with SHAD are invited to be featured on the Points blog (https://pointsadhsblog.wordpress.com/), an online space for exchanging new ideas, insights, and speculations about our interdisciplinary and rapidly evolving field.

Herzberg, Campbell, and Richert (L to R)

SHAD editors Nancy Campbell, David Herzberg, and Lucas Richert are absolutely thrilled with the journal’s new home, which will give its excellent scholarship the visibility and intellectual connections merited at a time of heightened and well-justified interest in the many worlds of drugs and alcohol. We are also delighted with our new cover design, featuring paintings by Jenny Kemp.

 

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Special Response: Over 100 Researchers and Practitioners Respond to Rod Rosenstein on Safe Injection Sites

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Editor’s Note: Today’s post is a letter coordinated by Kathleen Frydl, author of The Drug Wars in America, 1940-1973. In it, she and 101 signees respond to an op-ed published last month in The New York Times by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, in which Rosenstein argued against supervised injection sites. 

Screenshot 2018-09-20 at 8.16.39 AM Rosenstein’s Op-Ed in the New York Times

In response to the current opioid crisis a number of cities in the United States are considering establishing safe injection sites for users of heroin and other illegal drugs. This is not a new idea. Cities in Canada and Europe currently have them, including a successful program in Vancouver. Safe injection sites provide a place for people to inject illicit drugs under medical supervision. In addition to a clean and warm space, they typically offer sterile injecting equipment and basic healthcare. Many also provide referrals to treatment, housing and other…

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Gender and Critical Drug Studies: Feminist Autoethnography, Gender and Drug Use

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes Elizabeth Ettore, Professor of Sociology in the School of Law and Social Justice at the University of Liverpool. In it, she explores more about her article on the utility of autoethnography in drug research, which appeared in a special co-produced edition of SHAD and CDP, Special Issue: Gender and Critical Drug Studies. Enjoy!

Screenshot 2018-09-05 at 8.17.33 PMIn my paper “Feminist autoethnography, gender and drug use: ‘Feeling about’ empathy while ‘storying the I,'” I explore autoethnography as a feminist method in the drugs field. My writing Women and Substance Usein the late 1980s/early 1990s felt like pathbreaking, feminist sociology. In 1986, when I was asked to write a book on the experiences of women who used drugs, very little had been published on women’s use of substances other than alcohol. At that time, the term “substance misuse” rather than “substance use” was used to stigmatize users; no one dared…

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When New Yorkers Turned On

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Editor’s Note: This post was written by Dr. Chris Elcock, an adjunct professor at the Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3 in Lyon, France, whom you might remember from his article on the early years of cannabis activism published last month. Today he discusses the use of LSD in New York City in the 1960s and its effect on the city’s culture. Enjoy!

Image result for new york lsd 1960sEight years ago I developed a keen interest in the social history of psychedelic drug use and ended up starting a PhD thesis on the history of LSD use in New York City. I based my project on the premises that New York had been somewhat ignored in the scholarship and in the popular mind. When you think of LSD, you think of the West Coast in the 1960s and its colorful Haight-Ashbury scene. San Francisco certainly had a long tradition of tolerance toward Bohemians and eccentrics and…

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Opioids, Addiction, Podcasts, and How You Can Help Points

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

science history instituteThe Science History Institute, formed by the merger of the Chemical Heritage Foundation and the Life Sciences Foundation, is a fantastic resource for those interested in researching the history of chemistry, chemical engineering, and the life sciences – topics that are necessary if we’re to understand the role that intoxicants have played in our lives.

Located in Philadelphia with outposts in Europe and California, the Science History Institute has an archive and library, an acclaimed museum, and a variety of fellowship programs that are definitely worth a look.

Through Distillations, their outlet for podcasts, a magazine, videos and blogs, the organization is also a publishing powerhouse. Check out their remarkable longform story on opioids, and subscribe to their podcast. The Institute is launching a new series on the history of addiction treatment, including The Narcotic Farm, Therapeutic Communities like Synanon, methadone maintenance, and buprenorphine/Suboxone…

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Hidden Figures of Drug History: Lenore Kandel (1932-2009)

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Editor’s Note: As a working mother of an active toddler, I don’t  have a lot of time to keep up with popular culture. But a few months ago my husband and I finally watched Hidden Figures. The movie is well done, and it got me thinking. First of all, is there anything Janelle Monae can’t do? And second, what if we applied this same idea – revealing the hidden and important roles of women – to our own field of drug and alcohol history?

And voila – Hidden Figures of Drug History was born. Today’s post is the first installment, in which we discuss Lenore Kandel, a too-often ignored leader of the counterculture and Beat movements. Enjoy!

“When a society is afraid of its poets, it is afraid of itself. A society afraid of itself stands as another definition of hell.” – Lenore Kandel

Kandel, who died…

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